More internal changes to Whisker Menu

One of the things I had not given a second thought to when writing Whisker Menu was my use of C++11. The new standard makes C++ much cleaner, and any Linux distro that has Xfce 4.8 or 4.10 mostly likely also has a version of GCC at least as recent as 4.6 (which is the earliest version of GCC that can compile the bits of C++11 I used).

However, not everybody is using Linux. There are a lot of BSD users out there who don’t yet have LLVM/Clang, and so in an effort to make my menu usable by as many people as possible I have downgraded to C++98. Some of the things I will miss most from C++11 are rvalue references (no more passing objects by const reference! yay!), range-based for, and the repurposed auto keyword:

C++11:

LauncherModel example(std::map<std::string, Launcher*> sorted_items)
{
	LauncherModel model;
	for (auto i : sorted_items)
	{
		model.append_item(i.second);
	}
	return model;
}

C++98:

void example(const std::map<std::string, Launcher*>& sorted_items, LauncherModel& model)
{
	for (std::map<std::string, Launcher*>::const_iterator i = sorted_items.begin(), end = sorted_items.end(); i != end; ++i)
	{
		model.append_item(i->second);
	}
}

For those who have never seen the new C++11 constructs, auto is a variable whose type is determined at compile time. That makes the code for dealing with STL iterators a lot cleaner. The range-based for is also nice for reducing code, and it even works with anything that provides begin() and end() functions!

Another change I have made is how I handle the signal callbacks. I had previously decided to use macros to hook up the GTK+ signals to C++ classes. However, I have since found the obfuscation of what is really going on to be frustrating at times. Because of that I have taken the macros out and replaced them with what they were actually doing, even if it does bloat the header files somewhat.

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